Archive for November 2015

This podcast is from the ECS Lecture by Adam Heller at the 228th ECS Meeting in Phoenix, AZ in Oct. 2015.

The press has done well in telling the public that CO2 emissions and global warming are associated.  Many political leaders are committed to reducing CO2 emissions to mitigate global warming through policies and subsidies encouraging energy efficiency and use of renewable energy.

What neither the press nor the political leaders publicize is that the underlying cause of the rapid rise in CO2 emissions is the increase of global energy consumption with global wealth, i.e. with the product of the per capita GDP and the world’s population.

Global wealth has increased in the past century about 250 fold and its growth is accelerating. A major part of the world’s population has emerged in the recent past from poverty and the world’s fraction of poor people continues to shrink.

About Adam Heller:
Adam Heller’s work in electrochemical engineering has touched the lives of people across the globe. As the inventor of the painless diabetes blood monitor, his developments in healthcare have had enormous societal and economic impact. Heller’s work spans a range of technologies, touching areas related to battery and energy.

00:0000:00

Read Full Post »

During the Electrochemical Energy Summit, which took place at the 228th ECS Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, we had a chance to sit down with some of the leading researchers in the field of energy technology.

In this podcast, you’ll hear key speakers from some of the top energy research institutions in the US discuss energy storage, changing the grid, and roadblocks for renewables. From solar critical issues to the growing global energy need, these experts delve into some of the most pressing topics facing the world today.

The podcast is moderated by ECS vice president Krishnan Rajeshwar, with guests David Wesolowski, The Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport (FIRST) Energy Frontier Research Center; M. Stanley Whittingham, NorthEast Center for Chemical Energy Storage (NECCES); Gary Rubloff, NEES Energy Frontier Research Center; and Paul Fenter, Center for Electrochemical Energy Science (CEES).

00:0000:00

Read Full Post »