Archive for October 2015

In 1995, ECS and the Chemical Heritage Foundation worked to compile various oral histories of some of the biggest names in electrochemical and solid state science. The series documents personal perspectives of key figures in ECS and the scientific community as a whole.

One key figure is Harold J. Read. Renowned for his work in Metallurgy, Read converted his private working space into a military metal shop to assist in work on the Manhattan Project during World War II.

In this final installation of Read’s series, listen as this pillar of electrochemistry discusses the connection between ECS and Bell Labs, with facts about esteemed scientist Bruce Hannay and Robert Burns. Additionally, Read discusses the state of electrochemical science as of 1995, his “Poohbah syndrome,” and the limits of electrochemistry.

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In 1995, ECS and the Chemical Heritage Foundation worked to compile various oral histories of some of the biggest names in electrochemical and solid state science. The series documents personal perspectives of key figures in ECS and the scientific community as a whole.

One key figure is Harold J. Read. Renowned for his work in Metallurgy, Read converted his private working space into a military metal shop to assist in work on the Manhattan Project during World War II.

Through his many years with ECS, Read has helped shape and establish many facets of the Society. Hear him talk about the changes within the Society, the human side of the science, and where he sees ECS going in the future.

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In 1995, ECS and the Chemical Heritage Foundation worked to compile various oral histories of some of the biggest names in electrochemical and solid state science. The series documents personal perspectives of key figures in ECS and the scientific community as a whole.

One key figure is Harold J. Read. Renowned for his work in Metallurgy, Read converted his private working space into a military metal shop to assist in work on the Manhattan Project during World War II.

In this installment of Read’s series, the pioneering scientist talks about cold fusion—a topic that is still controversial among scientists to this day. Listen as Read shares stores about world-renowned scientist Ernest B. Yeager, Read’s time as president of ECS, and diversity in science.

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In 1995, ECS and the Chemical Heritage Foundation worked to compile various oral histories of some of the biggest names in electrochemical and solid state science. The series documents personal perspectives of key figures in ECS and the scientific community as a whole.

One key figure is Harold J. Read. Renowned for his work in Metallurgy, Read converted his private working space into a military metal shop to assist in work on the Manhattan Project during World War II.

While Read is recognized for his work in electrochemistry among the scientific community, he also contributed a great deal to scientific publications. From his editorial work on the Journal of The Electrochemical Society to the then criticism for publishing ground-breaking research—Read has helped shape peer reviewed publications.

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In 1995, ECS and the Chemical Heritage Foundation worked to compile various oral histories of some of the biggest names in electrochemical and solid state science. The series documents personal perspectives of key figures in ECS and the scientific community as a whole.

One key figure is Harold J. Read. Renowned for his work in Metallurgy, Read converted his private working space into a military metal shop to assist in work on the Manhattan Project during World War II.

In this second segment of Read’s series, we get a look into the science involved in World War II efforts, including Read’s interesting involvement in the Manhattan Project. The pillar of metallurgy also covers the science of electroplating, his connection to the Atomic Energy Commission, and ECS and the “Society of Potpourri.”

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In 1995, ECS and the Chemical Heritage Foundation worked to compile various oral histories of some of the biggest names in electrochemical and solid state science. The series documents personal perspectives of key figures in ECS and the scientific community as a whole.

One key figure is Harold J. Read. Renowned for his work in Metallurgy, Read converted his private working space into a military metal shop to assist in work on the Manhattan Project during World War II.

In this first segment of Read’s series, the pioneering metallurgist discusses his early years, where he got his roots in science, and his connection to the famous electro-organic chemist Sherlock Swann.

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Harry Atwater is a scientist on the forefront of alternative energy technologies. From artificial photosynthesis to photovoltaics technology, his work is dedicated to the development of efficient, low cost electrochemical energy devices to help address the energy crisis and secure a sustainable future.

Currently, Atwater is the Howard Hughes Professor of Applied Physics and Materials Science at the California Institute of Technology and Director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis. He and his group at Caltech have been involved in photovoltaics research for more than 20 years, and have developed such novel innovations as the silicon wire array solar cell.

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